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Squid Ink Pasta with Shrimp, Nduja, and Tomato

Squid Ink Pasta with Shrimp, Nduja, and Tomato


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No nduja? Just add an extra glug of olive oil along with some red pepper flakes.

Ingredients

  • 1 pound large head-on or shell-on shrimp
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 6 garlic cloves, divided, 2 smashed, 4 thinly sliced
  • 1 cup tomato passata or puréed whole peeled tomatoes
  • 12 ounces squid ink linguine
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh parsley, plus more for serving
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Recipe Preparation

  • Peel and devein shrimp, saving heads and/or shells. Finely chop shrimp; set aside. Heat 1 Tbsp. oil in a medium saucepan over medium-high and cook smashed garlic, stirring, until golden, about 1 minute. Add reserved shrimp heads and/or shells and cook, stirring, until bright pink, about 2 minutes. Add bay leaf and 2 cups water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until stock is slightly reduced and flavorful, 8–10 minutes. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve into a large bowl; discard solids.

  • Heat remaining 2 Tbsp. oil in a large skillet over medium-high. Add sliced garlic and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 1 minute. Remove skillet from heat and carefully add tomatoes and 1 cup stock (mixture may sputter). Return to heat and cook, stirring occasionally, until sauce is beginning to thicken, about 3 minutes. Add nduja, using a wooden spoon to work it into the sauce. Reduce heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, until flavors have melded, about 3 minutes. Stir in reserved shrimp and cook, stirring occasionally, until opaque, about 2 minutes.

  • Meanwhile, cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water, stirring occasionally, until very al dente (pasta will still be opaque and very firm in the center). Drain pasta, reserving 1½ cups pasta cooking liquid.

  • Add pasta and 1 cup pasta cooking liquid to sauce and cook, tossing often and adding more cooking liquid to help finish cooking pasta, until pasta is al dente and sauce is thickened (but still saucy) and coats pasta, about 5 minutes. Add lemon juice and ¼ cup parsley; toss. Taste and season with salt and pepper. Serve pasta topped with more parsley.

  • Do Ahead: Stock can be made 1 day ahead. Let cool; cover and chill. Wrap tightly and chill shrimp separately.

Nutritional Content

Calories (kcal) 620 Fat (g) 24 Saturated Fat (g) 6 Cholesterol (mg) 165 Carbohydrates (g) 70 Dietary Fiber (g) 4 Total Sugars (g) 5 Protein (g) 32 Sodium (mg) 1040Reviews SectionVery Yummy! Instead of the Knudi we used finely chopped salami, capacola and some pepper flakes. Excellent and flavorful!AnonymousSan Diego 05/13/20Simple, tasty and visually impressive. The fatty nduja nicely sort of melts into the sauce a bit. Comforting savory and slightly briny dish.AnonymousLos Angeles09/26/18

Squid ink pasta with shrimp, nduja, and tomato from Bon Appétit Magazine, March 2015: The Comfort Food Issue (page 58)

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  • bay leaves
  • garlic
  • lemons
  • parsley
  • shrimp
  • tomato passata
  • squid ink linguine pasta
  • nduja sausage

Always check the publication for a full list of ingredients. An Eat Your Books index lists the main ingredients and does not include 'store-cupboard ingredients' (salt, pepper, oil, flour, etc.) - unless called for in significant quantity.


[Homemade] Squid Ink Maccheroni with Shrimp, Nduja, and Tomato

It gives the pasta a briny flavor that pairs well with seafood., and makes it look cool.

1 pound large head-on or shell-on shrimp

3 tablespoons olive oil, divided

6 garlic cloves, divided, 2 smashed, 4 thinly sliced

1 cup tomato passata or puréed whole peeled tomatoes

12 ounces squid ink linguini

1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley, plus more for serving

Freshly ground black pepper

Peel and devein shrimp, saving heads and/or shells. Finely chop shrimp set aside. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a medium saucepan over medium-high and cook smashed garlic, stirring, until golden, about 1 minute. Add reserved shrimp heads and/or shells and cook, stirring, until bright pink, about 2 minutes. Add bay leaf and 2 cups water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until stock is slightly reduced and flavorful, 8–10 minutes. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve into a large bowl discard solids.

Heat remaining 2 tablespoons oil in a large skillet over medium-high. Add sliced garlic and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 1 minute. Remove skillet from heat and carefully add tomatoes and 1 cup stock (mixture may sputter). Return to heat and cook, stirring occasionally, until sauce is beginning to thicken, about 3 minutes. Add nduja, using a wooden spoon to work it into the sauce. Reduce heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, until flavors have melded, about 3 minutes. Stir in reserved shrimp and cook, stirring occasionally, until opaque, about 2 minutes.

Meanwhile, cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water, stirring occasionally, until very al dente (pasta will still be opaque and very firm in the center). Drain pasta, reserving 1 1/2 cups pasta cooking liquid.

Add pasta and 1 cup pasta cooking liquid to sauce and cook, tossing often and adding more cooking liquid to help finish cooking pasta, until pasta is al dente and sauce is thickened (but still saucy) and coats pasta, about 5 minutes. Add lemon juice and 1/4 cup parsley toss. Taste and season with salt and pepper. Serve pasta topped with more parsley.

Do ahead: Stock can be made 1 day ahead. Let cool cover and chill. Wrap tightly and chill shrimp separately.


Squid ink recipes

The ink of cephalopods such as squid and cuttlefish have historically been used in a number of ways, but more recently the primary use has been in cooking. Popular in Spanish cuisine, in addition to lending a dramatic quality to pasta and risotto dishes, the jet black ink also brings a unique flavour quality to the dishes it colours. Squid ink can be purchased in sachets online and from fishmongers, but if you are feeling adventurous you could try extracting the ink yourself.

For an imaginatively presented starter, try Luke Holder’s crab with garganelli recipe, which is served in a crab’s head. For an easy main, Andrew MacKenzie’s squid ink risotto, garnished with a lobster claw, has real impact, as does Colin McGurran’s impressive baked bream with nero sauce. For a meatier main option, Steven Smith’s chicken, asparagus and mushroom recipe utilises the dramatic qualities of squid ink for a stunning charred leek purée.


Rustichella Squid Ink Tonnarelli Pasta

It's an ocean of flavor, with this striking, delectable Italian pasta.

Quick Facts

Origin: Italy
Unit Size: 500 grams

The Flavor Experience

Slightly salty and deeply flavored. This is a pasta we can slurp for days, and is found in some of our favorite recipes.

The Story

Crafted with fresh black squid ink, mixed with durum wheat semolina and water. The result is a sultry, dark noodle with a light salinity that is a delicious match with shellfish.

Usage Tips

Whip up a peppery, tomato-based sauce with salmon, or enjoy simply with olive oil, sea salt and chopped parsley.


SQUID INK TONNARELLI WITH ARRABIATA SAUCE, SHRIMP & NDUJA
Recipe by Jackie Botto


1. Prepare pasta according to the package directions.
2. Meanwhile, in a large pan, on low heat, add 4 TBSP of Nduja , break it up and allow it to melt.
3. Add the entire jar of Di Bruno Bros. Arrabiata Sauce to the pan.
4. Add fresh or frozen shrimp and simmer until cooked through.
5. When the pasta is finished cooking, use tongs to remove the pasta from the pot and add to the pan.
6. Toss pasta thoroughly with sauce.
7. Garnish with fresh parsley.

You Might Also Enjoy

Arrabiata Pasta Sauce

Tempesta Nduja

It's an ocean of flavor, with this striking, delectable Italian pasta.

Quick Facts

Origin: Italy
Unit Size: 500 grams

The Flavor Experience

Slightly salty and deeply flavored. This is a pasta we can slurp for days, and is found in some of our favorite recipes.

The Story

Crafted with fresh black squid ink, mixed with durum wheat semolina and water. The result is a sultry, dark noodle with a light salinity that is a delicious match with shellfish.

Usage Tips

Whip up a peppery, tomato-based sauce with salmon, or enjoy simply with olive oil, sea salt and chopped parsley.


SQUID INK TONNARELLI WITH ARRABIATA SAUCE, SHRIMP & NDUJA
Recipe by Jackie Botto


1. Prepare pasta according to the package directions.
2. Meanwhile, in a large pan, on low heat, add 4 TBSP of Nduja , break it up and allow it to melt.
3. Add the entire jar of Di Bruno Bros. Arrabiata Sauce to the pan.
4. Add fresh or frozen shrimp and simmer until cooked through.
5. When the pasta is finished cooking, use tongs to remove the pasta from the pot and add to the pan.
6. Toss pasta thoroughly with sauce.
7. Garnish with fresh parsley.


Chik n' pastry

So, yeah. Hi!

The other night, Chris asked me how long it’s been since I’d posted. July 2014. Woah. But on occasion, I miss this place. I know I say that every time I disappear for a while, but it’s true. Plus, sometimes I make something that I just need to share. And tonight, that happened.

I still cook the same way. A lot of other things have changed (more on that in a moment), but I still clip recipes from my favorite magazines, and sometimes they sit around for a while, sometimes they get cooked immediately. Nduja (en-doo-yah), a spicy, spreadable pork sausage, is an ingredient I’ve wanted to cook with for a long time. I found a recipe in a recent Bon Appetit magazine that I couldn’t resist – a pasta sauce made with nduja, with small pieces of shrimp nestled within, and squid ink pasta running throughout.

The first step is making a quick and easy shrimp stock. As much as I hate peeling shrimp, when I make shrimp stock I realize that it only takes about 5 minutes to shell a pound of them, and whether or not you need shrimp stock in the recipe at hand, you should always, always make it and freeze it if you don’t need it. In fact, I still have lobster stock in the freezer from who knows when. I really don’t know when…

I’m sure you could buy squid ink (actually, I know you can) and make your own fresh pasta injected with it, but I prefer to just pay someone to do this part. I’m all about a cooking project, but not on a weeknight, and this is a weeknight recipe, no doubt. If you’re in San Francisco, Local Mission Market is the place to go.

The end result is really magnificent. Saucy, spicy amazingness bathing fresh, black pasta with a nubbin of shrimp in every single bite. It reminds me just a tad of paella – and I’m not sure I can explain why, so I’ll just let you decide, if you decide, of course, to whip this up.

Did you see a little furry face in the background above? Go look again – you were probably focused on the pasta. Not judging.

But I’ll back up for a minute. A while ago, I mentioned that we were house-hunting. It takes a long time in San Francisco. Well, 7 months and 7 offers later, it finally happened! We moved late in August last year, and said Adios! to that little ol’ Mission apartment. We now live in a neighborhood called Mission Dolores, right between the Mission and the Castro, and super convenient for practically everything in the city. I haven’t been as good about sharing pictures on social media, but I did upload a few to Flickr, so feel free to take a look.

Now those of you who read here frequently know I was crazy-attached to my Tangerine. It took a lot longer than I previously thought to even consider another cat around here. But shortly after we moved, we were visiting a favorite winery, and they happened to have another litter of kittens (does that sound weird? It’s totally normal, I promise). We found an adorable tiny little blob of fur whose wee little eyes were practically begging us to take her home. But we didn’t. We were both traveling for work the next week, so the timing didn’t add up. We said goodbye, and crossed our fingers that she wouldn’t get eaten by a coyote (kidding, sort of), and the following weekend, we came back and got her. Life with a little kitten has been so much fun. But now she’s giant, it seems, because they always grow so dang fast. But this one – this little Sirah – she is something really special. I can’t believe I already love her so much, and she’s pretty attached to us, too.

So, now we’re all caught up, right? Things have definitely changed, but really, a lot is still the same. And all of it – every last bit – couldn’t be better.

Squid Ink Pasta With Shrimp, Nduja, And Tomato

adapted from Bon Appetit, March 2015 serves 4
time commitment: 45 minutes, most active

printable recipe

ingredients
1 lb large shell-on shrimp
3 T olive oil, divided
6 garlic cloves, divided, 2 smashed, 4 thinly sliced
1 bay leaf
1 c puréed tomatoes
4 oz nduja
Kosher salt
12 oz squid ink spaghetti
¼ c fresh lemon juice
¼ c chopped fresh parsley, plus more for serving
Freshly ground black pepper

instructions
Peel and devein shrimp, saving shells. Finely chop shrimp set aside. Heat 1 Tbsp. oil in a medium saucepan over medium-high and cook smashed garlic, stirring, until golden, about 1 minute. Add reserved shells and cook, stirring, until bright pink, about 2 minutes. Add bay leaf and 2 cups water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until stock is slightly reduced and flavorful, 8–10 minutes. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve into a large bowl discard solids.

Heat remaining 2 Tbsp. oil in a large skillet over medium-high. Add sliced garlic and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 1 minute. Remove skillet from heat and carefully add tomatoes and 1 cup stock. Return to heat and cook, stirring occasionally, until sauce is beginning to thicken, about 3 minutes. Add nduja, using a wooden spoon to work it into the sauce. Reduce heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, until flavors have melded, about 3 minutes. Stir in reserved shrimp and cook, stirring occasionally, until opaque, about 2 minutes.

Meanwhile, cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water, stirring occasionally, until very al dente (fresh-made pasta will only need about 2-4 minutes to cook). Drain pasta, reserving 1½ cups pasta cooking liquid.

Add pasta and 1 cup pasta cooking liquid to sauce and cook, tossing often and adding more cooking liquid to help finish cooking pasta, until pasta is al dente and sauce is thickened (but still saucy) and coats pasta, about 5 minutes. Add lemon juice and ¼ cup parsley toss. Taste and season with salt and pepper. Serve pasta topped with more parsley.


Scrub the shells then soak the mussels in a bowl of water with a few tablespoons of flour for 30 minutes, or so the mussels spew any sand that may be lurking in the shells. Nobody likes a mouthful of sand, except live mussels. Rinse them before adding to the stew.

I prefer a cioppino that’s easy to eat so I shell and remove the tails from my shrimp before cooking.

And while I LOVE crab, I don’t usually include it because it’s a mess to crack the shells after they’ve been soaked in that lush tomato broth. If you decide to use crab, I suggest you cut the legs in half lengthwise for your guests so the meat is easy to strip straight from the shell.


Chitarrine con Terra e Mare

Terra e mare literally means “land and sea”—the Italian version of “surf and turf.” It refers to any dish that combines seafood with meat or mushrooms or other items found inland. ’Nduja is a spicy pork salami from Calabria that is soft and spreadable.

Chitarrine con Terra e Mare
(“Surf and Turf" Chitarra Pasta)

Yield: 4 servings as a first course

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2 cloves garlic
8 ounces shrimp, peeled, deveined and cut into bite-size pieces
Fine sea salt to taste
Coarse sea salt for cooking pasta
1½ pounds squid ink chitarrine (see note below)
¼ cup diced ’nduja, casing removed
2 tablespoons white wine
2 teaspoons crushed red pepper flakes
¾ cup tomato puree
¼ cup chopped flat-leaf parsley

Bring 6 quarts of water to a boil for the pasta. Meanwhile, heat a sauté pan over low heat. Once the pan is warm, add the oil and garlic cloves. Cook, stirring frequently, until the garlic is browned, then remove and discard it. Add the shrimp and sauté until cooked through. Season with fine sea salt and remove from the pan with a slotted spoon and set aside.

Season the boiling water with coarse sea salt and add the pasta.

Add the ’nduja to the pan in which you cooked the shrimp and turn the heat up to medium-high. Deglaze the pan with the wine. Add the red pepper flakes and cook, stirring frequently, until the wine has reduced by three-quarters. Add the tomato puree and continue to cook until the sauce has reduced by about a quarter and is thickened. Taste and adjust salt.

When the pasta is al dente, scoop out 1 cup of the cooking water and set aside. Drain the pasta in a colander, then transfer to the pan with the sauce.

Toss the pasta vigorously to coat it with the sauce. Add the shrimp and parsley and continue to toss with the sauce. If the sauce is too thick, add some cooking water in small amounts. Toss to combine well and serve immediately.

NOTA BENE: You can purchase squid ink chitarrine at Eataly. But if you’d like to make your own, start with hour basic fresh pasta dough, making the dough with 4 large eggs and 4 cups 00 flour or unbleached all-purpose flour. Add squid ink to the flour well with the eggs in step 1 and proceed. Use about 1 tablespoon squid ink per egg/portion. Roll out the dough and lay a sheet atop a chitarra pasta tool, then use a rolling pin to press the dough through the strings, creating square-shaped pasta.

This recipe is an excerpt from our book, All About Pasta. Pick up your copy in our marketplace!


Top pairings

Calamari or squid is often served as a starter or appetiser with other dishes so you need to bear that in mind when you&rsquore choosing a wine to pair with it. It also depends on the way you prepare it.

Except when it's cooked with red wine I'd say that almost any crisp citrussy white would work, sauvignon blanc being the obvious option but plenty of French, Italian, Spanish and Portuguese whites would work too: Picpoul, albarino, Rueda, vinho verde - squid is really white wine-friendly.

Fried calamari or chipirones

Fried food is great with anything fizzy so a sparkling wine such as cava or a crémant would be perfect. Or if it&rsquos part of a selection of Greek mezze, a crisp citrussy white like Assyrtiko. Chilled manzanilla sherry would also be brilliant especially with Spanish-style chipirones (baby squid).

Salt and pepper squid

A popular dish in Chinese restaurants. It may be more or less spicy but a dry riesling should work really well or, if it includes other Asian flavours as in this dish of this crispy chilli lime squid with edamame bean and coriander salad - maybe a pinot gris.

Chargrilled squid

Often squid is cooked on the grill or over an open fire which makes the dish more robust. A slightly richer white such as a good albarino can handle that. A Provençal rosé - especially a Bandol rosé - would also be great.

Braised squid with red wine

A chef friend of mine used to cook a dish of squid with red wine, orange and fennel which definitely made it a red wine rather than a white wine dish. A juicy Spanish red such as Bobal or a young rioja would work really well

Risotto nero, squid ink linguini and other dishes with squid ink

Squid ink adds a savoury, slightly saline boost to a dish but basically it&rsquos a case of the same type of crisp dry white. Something like a Greco di Tufo or a Rueda as in this pairing from a Spanish holiday a couple of years ago. Albarino should work well too as you can see from this pairing with arroz negro.

And if you want to try cooking squid for yourself try this delicious recipe for Barbequed brochette of prawns, squid and courgette with sauce vierge.

Photo ©rondon at fotolia.com

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Squid Ink Pasta with Shrimp, Nduja, and Tomato - Recipes

Cajun Shrimp & Grits
Adapted from The Boathouse in Charleston, SC via Epicurious.com serves 6

this is a great recipe even if you aren't in the grits camp, but you have to enjoy a lil' spice in your life! alternatively, you could omit the hot sauce on top, but to me, that's the best part :).

ingredients
hot pepper cream sauce
1/3 c hot sauce (preferably Frank's)
1/4 c dry white wine
1 shallot, chopped
1 T fresh lemon juice
1 T rice vinegar
1 c half & half (divided, half is for grits)

grits
5 c water
3 c 2% milk
1/4 c (1/2 stick) unsalted butter
2 c corn grits (not 'quick cooking' grits)

everything else
1/4 c olive oil
8 oz smoked andouille sausage*, casings removed
1 red bell pepper, chopped
1 green bell pepper, chopped
1/2 c minced onion
4 garlic cloves, chopped
30 uncooked large shrimp, peeled, deveined
4 plum tomatoes, chopped
2 t Cajun seasoning
2 t Old Bay seasoning
chives, minced, for garnish

instructions
Combine hot pepper sauce, wine, shallot, lemon juice and vinegar in heavy medium saucepan. Boil over medium heat until reduced to 1/2 c, about 15 minutes. Stir in 1/2 c half & half. Cover and refrigerate (can make in advance).

Bring 1/2 c half & half, 5 cups water, milk and butter to simmer in heavy medium saucepan. Gradually whisk in grits. Simmer until grits are very soft and thickened, stirring frequently, about 45 minutes to 1 hour.

Meanwhile, heat olive oil in heavy medium skillet over medium heat. Add sausage, both bell peppers, onion and garlic sauté until vegetables are tender, about 8 minutes. Add shrimp, tomatoes, Cajun seasoning and Old Bay seasoning and sauté until shrimp are opaque in center, about 6 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Bring hot pepper-cream sauce to simmer. Spoon grits onto 6 plates, dividing equally. Spoon shrimp mixture over grits. Drizzle hot pepper-cream sauce over and serve.

*andouille sausage is is spicy, smoked pork & beef sausage. I get mine from the sausage case @ Whole Foods, but if you can't find it, you can substitute any other spicy sausage and either slice it thinly or remove the casings and use it ground.


Watch the video: Η πιο γρήγορη u0026 νόστιμη μακαρονάδα με θαλασσινά και κόκκινη σάλτσα από τον Γιάννη Αποστολάκη. Dot. (June 2022).