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Sustainable Business: Vital Choice Seafood-From Wild Fisheries to Your Doorstep

Sustainable Business: Vital Choice Seafood-From Wild Fisheries to Your Doorstep


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Randy Hartnell started Vital Choice Seafood over 20 years ago after noticing farm raised salmon was compromising the longevity of the fish and causing financial strains on local fishermen and their surrounding environment. Hartnell, a former Alaskan fisherman runs a company that captures fresh, sustainably harvested Alaskan seafood fresh to your doorstep. The fisheries that supply the seafood are certified sustainable by the State of Alaska.


The Best Way to Buy Sustainable Seafood? Support a Local Fishery

Trying to buy sustainable seafood generally means falling down a wormhole of charts, ranking systems, and misinformation. Recently, an AP investigation alleged that popular online seafood purveyor Sea to Table misled customers regarding its sourcing and supply chain transparency, among other claims (Sea to Table has refuted several of these allegations.) To better understand how consumers should seek out sustainable seafood options, we turned to Sheila Bowman, Manager of Culinary & Strategic Initiatives for the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch.

"Take the lessons that you know from the farmers' market and apply them to fish," says Bowman. "Eat what’s seasonal and available and you’ll get a better product than demanding tuna in the middle of winter." Seafood Watch has an app that provides up-to-date seafood recommendations, season by season, to keep you informed at the fish counter.

Likely the best way to get domestic, wild-caught seafood delivered to your door is through a community-supported fishery (CSF), which is basically a traditional CSA farm share but for fish. The format varies, but most involve purchasing shares of the CSF at the beginning of the season, which helps pay the upfront costs of harvesting and processing seafood. This allows family fisherman to stay small and minimize their environmental impact while making a living wage.

"We love the CSF model," says Bowman. "If you’re buying locally from a sustainable fishery that has their hands on the product, I don’t know how much better you can do than that." For fish lovers in landlocked parts of the country, she recommends look for CSFs with detailed information and a short supply chain that will ship to your area. To find one near you, check the Local Catch online network, or check out this list of regional favorites.


The Best Way to Buy Sustainable Seafood? Support a Local Fishery

Trying to buy sustainable seafood generally means falling down a wormhole of charts, ranking systems, and misinformation. Recently, an AP investigation alleged that popular online seafood purveyor Sea to Table misled customers regarding its sourcing and supply chain transparency, among other claims (Sea to Table has refuted several of these allegations.) To better understand how consumers should seek out sustainable seafood options, we turned to Sheila Bowman, Manager of Culinary & Strategic Initiatives for the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch.

"Take the lessons that you know from the farmers' market and apply them to fish," says Bowman. "Eat what’s seasonal and available and you’ll get a better product than demanding tuna in the middle of winter." Seafood Watch has an app that provides up-to-date seafood recommendations, season by season, to keep you informed at the fish counter.

Likely the best way to get domestic, wild-caught seafood delivered to your door is through a community-supported fishery (CSF), which is basically a traditional CSA farm share but for fish. The format varies, but most involve purchasing shares of the CSF at the beginning of the season, which helps pay the upfront costs of harvesting and processing seafood. This allows family fisherman to stay small and minimize their environmental impact while making a living wage.

"We love the CSF model," says Bowman. "If you’re buying locally from a sustainable fishery that has their hands on the product, I don’t know how much better you can do than that." For fish lovers in landlocked parts of the country, she recommends look for CSFs with detailed information and a short supply chain that will ship to your area. To find one near you, check the Local Catch online network, or check out this list of regional favorites.


The Best Way to Buy Sustainable Seafood? Support a Local Fishery

Trying to buy sustainable seafood generally means falling down a wormhole of charts, ranking systems, and misinformation. Recently, an AP investigation alleged that popular online seafood purveyor Sea to Table misled customers regarding its sourcing and supply chain transparency, among other claims (Sea to Table has refuted several of these allegations.) To better understand how consumers should seek out sustainable seafood options, we turned to Sheila Bowman, Manager of Culinary & Strategic Initiatives for the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch.

"Take the lessons that you know from the farmers' market and apply them to fish," says Bowman. "Eat what’s seasonal and available and you’ll get a better product than demanding tuna in the middle of winter." Seafood Watch has an app that provides up-to-date seafood recommendations, season by season, to keep you informed at the fish counter.

Likely the best way to get domestic, wild-caught seafood delivered to your door is through a community-supported fishery (CSF), which is basically a traditional CSA farm share but for fish. The format varies, but most involve purchasing shares of the CSF at the beginning of the season, which helps pay the upfront costs of harvesting and processing seafood. This allows family fisherman to stay small and minimize their environmental impact while making a living wage.

"We love the CSF model," says Bowman. "If you’re buying locally from a sustainable fishery that has their hands on the product, I don’t know how much better you can do than that." For fish lovers in landlocked parts of the country, she recommends look for CSFs with detailed information and a short supply chain that will ship to your area. To find one near you, check the Local Catch online network, or check out this list of regional favorites.


The Best Way to Buy Sustainable Seafood? Support a Local Fishery

Trying to buy sustainable seafood generally means falling down a wormhole of charts, ranking systems, and misinformation. Recently, an AP investigation alleged that popular online seafood purveyor Sea to Table misled customers regarding its sourcing and supply chain transparency, among other claims (Sea to Table has refuted several of these allegations.) To better understand how consumers should seek out sustainable seafood options, we turned to Sheila Bowman, Manager of Culinary & Strategic Initiatives for the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch.

"Take the lessons that you know from the farmers' market and apply them to fish," says Bowman. "Eat what’s seasonal and available and you’ll get a better product than demanding tuna in the middle of winter." Seafood Watch has an app that provides up-to-date seafood recommendations, season by season, to keep you informed at the fish counter.

Likely the best way to get domestic, wild-caught seafood delivered to your door is through a community-supported fishery (CSF), which is basically a traditional CSA farm share but for fish. The format varies, but most involve purchasing shares of the CSF at the beginning of the season, which helps pay the upfront costs of harvesting and processing seafood. This allows family fisherman to stay small and minimize their environmental impact while making a living wage.

"We love the CSF model," says Bowman. "If you’re buying locally from a sustainable fishery that has their hands on the product, I don’t know how much better you can do than that." For fish lovers in landlocked parts of the country, she recommends look for CSFs with detailed information and a short supply chain that will ship to your area. To find one near you, check the Local Catch online network, or check out this list of regional favorites.


The Best Way to Buy Sustainable Seafood? Support a Local Fishery

Trying to buy sustainable seafood generally means falling down a wormhole of charts, ranking systems, and misinformation. Recently, an AP investigation alleged that popular online seafood purveyor Sea to Table misled customers regarding its sourcing and supply chain transparency, among other claims (Sea to Table has refuted several of these allegations.) To better understand how consumers should seek out sustainable seafood options, we turned to Sheila Bowman, Manager of Culinary & Strategic Initiatives for the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch.

"Take the lessons that you know from the farmers' market and apply them to fish," says Bowman. "Eat what’s seasonal and available and you’ll get a better product than demanding tuna in the middle of winter." Seafood Watch has an app that provides up-to-date seafood recommendations, season by season, to keep you informed at the fish counter.

Likely the best way to get domestic, wild-caught seafood delivered to your door is through a community-supported fishery (CSF), which is basically a traditional CSA farm share but for fish. The format varies, but most involve purchasing shares of the CSF at the beginning of the season, which helps pay the upfront costs of harvesting and processing seafood. This allows family fisherman to stay small and minimize their environmental impact while making a living wage.

"We love the CSF model," says Bowman. "If you’re buying locally from a sustainable fishery that has their hands on the product, I don’t know how much better you can do than that." For fish lovers in landlocked parts of the country, she recommends look for CSFs with detailed information and a short supply chain that will ship to your area. To find one near you, check the Local Catch online network, or check out this list of regional favorites.


The Best Way to Buy Sustainable Seafood? Support a Local Fishery

Trying to buy sustainable seafood generally means falling down a wormhole of charts, ranking systems, and misinformation. Recently, an AP investigation alleged that popular online seafood purveyor Sea to Table misled customers regarding its sourcing and supply chain transparency, among other claims (Sea to Table has refuted several of these allegations.) To better understand how consumers should seek out sustainable seafood options, we turned to Sheila Bowman, Manager of Culinary & Strategic Initiatives for the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch.

"Take the lessons that you know from the farmers' market and apply them to fish," says Bowman. "Eat what’s seasonal and available and you’ll get a better product than demanding tuna in the middle of winter." Seafood Watch has an app that provides up-to-date seafood recommendations, season by season, to keep you informed at the fish counter.

Likely the best way to get domestic, wild-caught seafood delivered to your door is through a community-supported fishery (CSF), which is basically a traditional CSA farm share but for fish. The format varies, but most involve purchasing shares of the CSF at the beginning of the season, which helps pay the upfront costs of harvesting and processing seafood. This allows family fisherman to stay small and minimize their environmental impact while making a living wage.

"We love the CSF model," says Bowman. "If you’re buying locally from a sustainable fishery that has their hands on the product, I don’t know how much better you can do than that." For fish lovers in landlocked parts of the country, she recommends look for CSFs with detailed information and a short supply chain that will ship to your area. To find one near you, check the Local Catch online network, or check out this list of regional favorites.


The Best Way to Buy Sustainable Seafood? Support a Local Fishery

Trying to buy sustainable seafood generally means falling down a wormhole of charts, ranking systems, and misinformation. Recently, an AP investigation alleged that popular online seafood purveyor Sea to Table misled customers regarding its sourcing and supply chain transparency, among other claims (Sea to Table has refuted several of these allegations.) To better understand how consumers should seek out sustainable seafood options, we turned to Sheila Bowman, Manager of Culinary & Strategic Initiatives for the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch.

"Take the lessons that you know from the farmers' market and apply them to fish," says Bowman. "Eat what’s seasonal and available and you’ll get a better product than demanding tuna in the middle of winter." Seafood Watch has an app that provides up-to-date seafood recommendations, season by season, to keep you informed at the fish counter.

Likely the best way to get domestic, wild-caught seafood delivered to your door is through a community-supported fishery (CSF), which is basically a traditional CSA farm share but for fish. The format varies, but most involve purchasing shares of the CSF at the beginning of the season, which helps pay the upfront costs of harvesting and processing seafood. This allows family fisherman to stay small and minimize their environmental impact while making a living wage.

"We love the CSF model," says Bowman. "If you’re buying locally from a sustainable fishery that has their hands on the product, I don’t know how much better you can do than that." For fish lovers in landlocked parts of the country, she recommends look for CSFs with detailed information and a short supply chain that will ship to your area. To find one near you, check the Local Catch online network, or check out this list of regional favorites.


The Best Way to Buy Sustainable Seafood? Support a Local Fishery

Trying to buy sustainable seafood generally means falling down a wormhole of charts, ranking systems, and misinformation. Recently, an AP investigation alleged that popular online seafood purveyor Sea to Table misled customers regarding its sourcing and supply chain transparency, among other claims (Sea to Table has refuted several of these allegations.) To better understand how consumers should seek out sustainable seafood options, we turned to Sheila Bowman, Manager of Culinary & Strategic Initiatives for the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch.

"Take the lessons that you know from the farmers' market and apply them to fish," says Bowman. "Eat what’s seasonal and available and you’ll get a better product than demanding tuna in the middle of winter." Seafood Watch has an app that provides up-to-date seafood recommendations, season by season, to keep you informed at the fish counter.

Likely the best way to get domestic, wild-caught seafood delivered to your door is through a community-supported fishery (CSF), which is basically a traditional CSA farm share but for fish. The format varies, but most involve purchasing shares of the CSF at the beginning of the season, which helps pay the upfront costs of harvesting and processing seafood. This allows family fisherman to stay small and minimize their environmental impact while making a living wage.

"We love the CSF model," says Bowman. "If you’re buying locally from a sustainable fishery that has their hands on the product, I don’t know how much better you can do than that." For fish lovers in landlocked parts of the country, she recommends look for CSFs with detailed information and a short supply chain that will ship to your area. To find one near you, check the Local Catch online network, or check out this list of regional favorites.


The Best Way to Buy Sustainable Seafood? Support a Local Fishery

Trying to buy sustainable seafood generally means falling down a wormhole of charts, ranking systems, and misinformation. Recently, an AP investigation alleged that popular online seafood purveyor Sea to Table misled customers regarding its sourcing and supply chain transparency, among other claims (Sea to Table has refuted several of these allegations.) To better understand how consumers should seek out sustainable seafood options, we turned to Sheila Bowman, Manager of Culinary & Strategic Initiatives for the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch.

"Take the lessons that you know from the farmers' market and apply them to fish," says Bowman. "Eat what’s seasonal and available and you’ll get a better product than demanding tuna in the middle of winter." Seafood Watch has an app that provides up-to-date seafood recommendations, season by season, to keep you informed at the fish counter.

Likely the best way to get domestic, wild-caught seafood delivered to your door is through a community-supported fishery (CSF), which is basically a traditional CSA farm share but for fish. The format varies, but most involve purchasing shares of the CSF at the beginning of the season, which helps pay the upfront costs of harvesting and processing seafood. This allows family fisherman to stay small and minimize their environmental impact while making a living wage.

"We love the CSF model," says Bowman. "If you’re buying locally from a sustainable fishery that has their hands on the product, I don’t know how much better you can do than that." For fish lovers in landlocked parts of the country, she recommends look for CSFs with detailed information and a short supply chain that will ship to your area. To find one near you, check the Local Catch online network, or check out this list of regional favorites.


The Best Way to Buy Sustainable Seafood? Support a Local Fishery

Trying to buy sustainable seafood generally means falling down a wormhole of charts, ranking systems, and misinformation. Recently, an AP investigation alleged that popular online seafood purveyor Sea to Table misled customers regarding its sourcing and supply chain transparency, among other claims (Sea to Table has refuted several of these allegations.) To better understand how consumers should seek out sustainable seafood options, we turned to Sheila Bowman, Manager of Culinary & Strategic Initiatives for the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch.

"Take the lessons that you know from the farmers' market and apply them to fish," says Bowman. "Eat what’s seasonal and available and you’ll get a better product than demanding tuna in the middle of winter." Seafood Watch has an app that provides up-to-date seafood recommendations, season by season, to keep you informed at the fish counter.

Likely the best way to get domestic, wild-caught seafood delivered to your door is through a community-supported fishery (CSF), which is basically a traditional CSA farm share but for fish. The format varies, but most involve purchasing shares of the CSF at the beginning of the season, which helps pay the upfront costs of harvesting and processing seafood. This allows family fisherman to stay small and minimize their environmental impact while making a living wage.

"We love the CSF model," says Bowman. "If you’re buying locally from a sustainable fishery that has their hands on the product, I don’t know how much better you can do than that." For fish lovers in landlocked parts of the country, she recommends look for CSFs with detailed information and a short supply chain that will ship to your area. To find one near you, check the Local Catch online network, or check out this list of regional favorites.